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1765, The Stamp Act Goes Into Effect

November 1, 1765: The Stamp Act Goes Into Effect.

The cost of war is a hefty burden that must be paid for somehow. Great Britain's vast Empire provided many potential resources to cover the costs of warfare following the French and Indian War and Pontiac's Rebellion, which both took place in the American colonies. In response, Parliament believed it was fair for the colonies to bear some, if not all, of the costs. The Sugar Act of 1764 was hidden in import duties, and many colonists were unaware that they were even paying it.


The Stamp Act went into effect on November 1, 1765, and the American colonies were not willing to comply. Benjamin Franklin even stated that the act would have to be imposed by force, which was something that England could not do. The colonists were outraged not only by the tax but also by the fact that they had no say in the matter. They openly opposed the tax, refusing to pay it or use the official paper. The colonies' opposition to the Stamp Act was so strong that it was ultimately repealed in March 1766. However, the damage had been done, and the discussion of rebellion was already underway, paving the way for war. The cost of war is an enormous burden that must be paid, and Great Britain's vast Empire had many potential resources to cover the costs of warfare following the French and Indian War and Pontiac's Rebellion in the American colonies. Parliament believed it was fair for the colonies to bear some, if not all, of the costs, and the Sugar Act of 1764 was hidden in import duties, unbeknownst to many colonists.


However, the Stamp Act, passed by Parliament on March 22, 1765, was a different story. The act required colonists to use officially stamped paper for any printed materials, from newspapers to playing cards. Without representation in Parliament, the colonists felt directly targeted by the act, which was a result of the general sentiment that the colonies should pay for the cost of their defense.


Despite going into effect on November 1, 1765, the American colonies were unwilling to comply. Benjamin Franklin even stated that force would be needed to impose the act, something that England could not do. The colonists were outraged by both the tax and the lack of say in the matter, openly opposing the tax and refusing to pay it or use the official paper. The colonies' opposition was so strong that the Stamp Act was ultimately repealed in March 1766. However, the damage had already been done, and the discussion of rebellion was already underway, paving the way for war.

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